Black Box – White Hat

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Photo Drupal has a pretty secure structure: a small, simple and stable core that can be extended with tons of modules and themes. From Drupal 7’s initial release on January 5, 2011 until now, there were only 17 core security updates, which is quite a small number for a period lasting longer than four years.

But when it comes to third-party modules and themes, the picture is quite different. Although only modules with official releases are reviewed by the security team, or have security announcements issued, the majority of the 11,000+ third-party modules and themes for Drupal 7 get weekly reports for security issues.

And using custom modules is even more dangerous if they are not tested properly. Let’s face it: no one uses Drupal without modules. That’s why I will share with you some of the best open source tools to improve the security of your website.

Knowing your opponent’s moves helps you better prepare your defenses. That’s why we will try to attack with every known-at-the-moment method of testing vulnerability. All the tools I will show are easy to use without any knowledge of the source code. And the best part is, you can use this strategy indefinitely, if you keep these tools up-to-date. Remember: update first, then test.

Being Up-to-Date

I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to keep all your stuff up-to-date, so let’s start with that idea: If one tiny part of your website has a security breach, the whole system is corrupted. That’s why you should check for updates for the core and the modules you are using. There are reports you can find on Drupal’s official page; if you find that there is a security update available, immediately apply it.

Metasploit + Armitage = Hail Mary!

Start with Kali Linux: it’s small, and has Metasploit and Armitage pre-installed. Armitage gives you a GUI, exploit recommendations, and use of the advanced features of Metasploit Framework’s Meterpreter. (But remember to get updates every time you’re about to run tests.)

Then, get an exact clone of the server; same machine, database, structure, OS version, etc.

NOTE: It is not recommended you use this technique on live websites because there is a chance the server will go down.


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