Drupal development community policy: diversity & inclusion

I quote:

Teams with diverse members make better products for more people. The dearth of diverse teams in tech, and in Drupal in particular, signals a culture where people of many different identities and backgrounds do not feel included in participating. By deliberately recruiting teams from spaces where people of diverse backgrounds collaborate, the DDI Contrib team is better positioned to have diversity in mind from the outset.

Smaller teams are better able to build an inclusive culture from the ground up, and enable one-on-one mentoring. A deliberately created initiative like the DDI Contrib Team is more likely to be visible and accomplish goals than perhaps impromptu teams or individual efforts.

It’s important to note that diversity should be intersectional, and consider race, gender, sexuality, disability, economic status, nationality, ethnicity, faith background, and speciality in Drupal/web development.

My question is: Why?

Teams with diverse members make better products for more people.

Is there any evidence for that?

Exactly which sort of diversity results in better products?  Age?  People from both Birmingham and Leeds?  Catholics and Protestants?

The dearth of diverse teams in tech, and in Drupal in particular, signals a culture where people of many different identities and backgrounds do not feel included in participating.

You’re saying that either currently or at some time in the past, people from many backgrounds do not or didn’t feel included in participating.  Is there actually any evidence of that?

By deliberately recruiting teams from spaces where people of diverse backgrounds collaborate, the DDI Contrib team is better positioned to have diversity in mind from the outset.

But why?  Why have diversity in mind at all?  Lacking any substantiation of why diversity (i.e. someone from Birmingham and someone from Leeds) equals good, wouldn’t it be better to just have good coding and design skills (regardless of the coders’ and designers’  irrelevant characteristics) in mind?

Smaller teams are better able to build an inclusive culture from the ground up

On the contrary, larger groups have more people, and therefore a greater probability of more people who are different.

and enable one-on-one mentoring

On the contrary, larger groups have more people, and therefore a greater probability that at any given time, there will be someone with time for mentoring someone else.

A deliberately created initiative like the DDI Contrib Team is more likely to be visible and accomplish goals than perhaps impromptu teams or individual efforts.

Any team deliberately created for a specific purpose has a good chance of producing something related to that purpose.  But that has absolutely nothing to do with diversity or such.

It’s important to note that diversity should be intersectional

How on Earth did “intersectional” (apparently relating to crossroads and round-abouts) even become a thing?  And what does it have to do with coding and design skills?

and consider race, gender, sexuality, disability, economic status, nationality, ethnicity, faith background,

None of those things have anything at all to do with coding or design talent.  Not one.  Why would or should anyone consider them in relation to coding and design?

speciality in Drupal/web development

Yeah, specialisation in some relevant technical area might be relevant.

In short, what does any of it have to do with developing a good product?  Or is it just some blatant virtue signalling for advertising purposes?


Source: https://www.drupal.org/taxonomy/term/2/feed