Setting higher standards for corporate contributions to Drupal

Last week I made a comment on Twitter that I’d like to see Pantheon contribute more to Drupal core. I wrote that in response to the announcement that Pantheon has raised a $30 million Series C. Pantheon has now raised $50 to $60 million dollars of working capital (depending on Industry Ventures’ $8.5M) and is in a special class of companies. This is an amazing milestone. Though it wasn’t meant that way, Pantheon and Acquia compete for business and my Tweet could be read as a cheap attack on a competitor, and so it resulted in a fair amount of criticism. Admittedly, Pantheon was neither the best nor the only example to single out. There are many companies that don’t contribute to Drupal at all – and Pantheon does contribute to Drupal in a variety of ways such as sponsoring events and supporting the development of contributed modules. In hindsight, I recognize that my tweet was not one of my best, and for that I apologize.

Having said that, I’d like to reiterate something I’ve said before, in my remarks at DrupalCon Amsterdam and many times on this blog: I would like to see more companies contribute more to Drupal core – with the emphasis on “core”. Drupal is now relied upon by many, and needs a strong base of commercial contributors. We have to build Drupal together. We need a bigger and more diverse base of organizations taking on both leadership and contribution.

Contribution to Drupal core is the most important type of contribution in terms of the impact it can make. It touches every aspect of Drupal and all users who depend on it. Long-term and full-time contribution to core is not within everyone’s reach. It typically requires larger investment due to a variety of things: the complexity of the problems we are solving, our need for stringent security and the importance of having a rigorous review-process. So much is riding on Drupal for all of us today. While every module, theme, event and display of goodwill in our community is essential, contributions to core are quite possibly the hardest and most thankless, but also the most rewarding of all when it comes to Drupal’s overall progress and success.

I believe we should have different expectations for different organizations based on their maturity, their funding, their profitability, how strategic Drupal is for them, etc. For example, sponsoring code sprints is an important form of contribution for small or mid-sized organizations. But for any organization that makes millions of dollars with Drupal, I would hope for more.

The real question that we have to answer is this: at what point should an organization meaningfully contribute to Drupal core? Some may say “never”, and that is their Open Source right. But as Drupal’s project lead it is also my right and responsibility to encourage those who benefit from Drupal to give back. It should not be taboo for our community to question organizations that don’t pull their weight, or choose not to contribute at all.

For me, committing my workdays and nights to Drupal isn’t the exhausting part of my job. It’s dealing with criticism that comes from false or incomplete information, or tackling differences in ideals and beliefs. I’ve learned not to sweat the small stuff, but it’s on important topics like giving back that my emotions and communication skills get tested. I will not apologize for encouraging organizations to contribute to Drupal core. It’s a really important topic and one that I’m very passionate about. I feel good knowing that I’m pushing these conversations from inside the arena rather than from the sidelines, and for the benefit of the Drupal project at large.


Source: http://buytaert.net/node/feed

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